Counseling Psychology News RSS Feedhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/News Feed from the University of Wisconsin - Madison Department of Counseling Psychology.urn:uuid:8fa9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/09/30/research-project-to-examine-internships-at-six-historically-black-colleges-and-universities Research project to examine internships at six historically black colleges and universitiesThe Center for Research on College-to-Workforce Transitions (CCWT) — a project at UW‒Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research — is collaborating with the United Negro College Fund’s Career Pathways Initiative and a vocational psychologist to study internship programs at six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that have a high population of STEM graduates.Mon, 30 Sep 2019 10:30:00 Z<p>The&nbsp;<a href="http://ccwt.wceruw.org/">Center for Research on College-to-Workforce Transitions (CCWT)</a>&nbsp;&mdash; a project at UW‒Madison&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>&nbsp;&mdash; is collaborating with the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.uncf.org/cpi">United Negro College Fund&rsquo;s Career Pathways Initiative</a>&nbsp;and a vocational psychologist to study internship programs at six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that have a high population of STEM graduates.</p> <p>The $1.5 million NSF-funded longitudinal, mixed-methods study aims to examine students&rsquo; experiences with their internships and how these experiences may impact their future wages, employment status,&nbsp;and vocational self-efficacy. This three-year study will be part of the larger &ldquo;<a href="http://ccwt.wceruw.org/research/projects.html#internship">College Internship Study</a>,&rdquo; launched by CCWT Director&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/About/Staff/1428">Matt Hora</a>&nbsp;and his team in early 2018&nbsp;that now includes over 14 institutions in the U.S., China, and Japan.</p> <p>According to Hora, colleges and universities are increasingly advocating that their students take internships. &ldquo;They are starting to recognize the role internships play in helping students make the sometimes difficult transition between college and the workforce,&rdquo; he says.</p> <p>However, the quality of internship programs varies greatly, states&nbsp;Hora, an expert on college-to-workforce issues and co-author of the acclaimed book, &ldquo;<a href="https://wcer.wisc.edu/news/detail/hora-receives-national-book-honor">Beyond the Skills Gap</a>.&rdquo; <br /> <br /> &ldquo;At too many institutions, we simply don&rsquo;t know enough about the quality of internships, and if colleges are prepared to support what are effectively complex college-employer partnerships. The field especially lacks insights into how internship programs are structured and experienced in the unique socio-cultural and historical contexts of HBCUs.&rdquo;</p> <p>Another gap in the literature relates to the question of whether all students&mdash;regardless of race, gender or socio-economic status&mdash;have access to internships. &ldquo;Research shows that hiring discrimination continues to be a problem, particularly for African American job seekers. And our own studies have revealed that many students simply cannot take an internship due to work obligations, lack of pay, or limited opportunities in their fields,&rdquo; Hora adds.</p> <p>LaToya Owens, director of Learning and Evaluation for the United Negro College Fund, who is partnering with Hora on this project, says there is a real need in higher education for a study that zeroes in on the actual internship experiences of underrepresented students. &ldquo;We really don&rsquo;t know what types of experiences African American students are having during their internships and how that translates to their ability to transition into the workforce. I believe this study will give us those answers.&rdquo;</p> <p>Using an interdisciplinary approach for this groundbreaking study, Hora has also enlisted the expertise of UW&ndash;Madison's&nbsp;<a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/people/faculty/mindi-thompson">Mindi Thompson</a>, a vocational psychologist and associate professor with the School of Education's&nbsp;<a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/Feeds/counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych website" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>. Thompson says this first-ever collaboration with Hora, an anthropologist and learning scientist by training, is a perfect marriage of skill sets. &ldquo;My research is about exploring the career and educational development of students, particularly those students who are diverse and underrepresented in some way; Matt brings a deep understanding of internships and job skills through the lens of higher education.&rdquo;</p> <p>Through surveys and focus groups with students, and interviews with employers and career services staff at six HBCUs&mdash;currently including Fayetteville State University in North Carolina, Morgan State University in Maryland, and Clark Atlanta University in Georgia &mdash; the researchers plan to generate rigorous, yet actionable, new insights about what factors contribute to a successful internship experience for African American students in STEM disciplines. &ldquo;There is not a lot of systematic research on college internships in the U.S.,&rdquo; says Thompson, &ldquo;so we are hoping to get a sense of the infrastructure for internships, both on campus and within different organizations that hire interns, to understand what works and what doesn&rsquo;t, and how internships can be designed to better serve students, particularly diverse and underrepresented students.&rdquo;</p> <p>One important component of the study is the controversial topic of paid vs. unpaid internships. &ldquo;Research is clear that paid interns tend to find more value in their internship and have better employment outcomes when they graduate,&rdquo; explains Hora, a strong advocate for paid internships. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s also an ethical issue. Students are under considerable pressure to pay for the rising costs of tuition and living expenses, and we simply shouldn&rsquo;t be asking them to work for free.&rdquo;&nbsp; Plus, says Hora, in a precarious labor market where benefits and job security are increasingly rare, engaging in unpaid labor sets an unfortunate precedent for students, colleges, and employers.</p> <p>This study and other important college internships topics, such as strategies for college-employer partnerships, designing effective learning spaces for 21st century skills and inequalities in the intern economy, will be explored at CCWT&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="http://ccwt.wceruw.org/symposium.html" target="_blank">2nd Annual Symposium on College Internship Research</a>, taking place Oct. 23-24 at the Pyle Center on the UW-Madison campus.</p>urn:uuid:a994c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/08/22/uw-madison-s-thompson-selected-as-fellow-of-apa-s-society-of-counseling-psychology UW-Madison's Thompson selected as fellow of APA’s Society of Counseling PsychologyUW–Madison’s Mindi Thompson was recently accepted as a fellow of the American Psychological Association’s Society of Counseling Psychology. Thompson is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology and is a licensed and registered health service psychologist. She also directs the Work and Wellness Lab. Thompson has published more than 30 peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters using qualitative and quantitative methods and has co-authored a research design textbook titled, "Research Design in Counseling.” Thu, 22 Aug 2019 10:40:00 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Mindi Thompson was recently accepted as a fellow of the American Psychological Association&rsquo;s Society of Counseling Psychology.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/mindi-thompson-300-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Mindi Thompson" displaymode="Original" title="Mindi Thompson 300 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Thompson </figcaption> </figure> </div> Thompson is an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a> and is a licensed and registered health service psychologist. Thompson also directs the <a href="https://workandwellness.education.wisc.edu" title="Work and Wellness website" target="_blank">Work and Wellness Lab</a>, which studies career development across the lifespan, how environmental factors impact experiences across life domains, and factors that promote wellness.</p> <p>Thompson has published more than 30 peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters using qualitative and quantitative methods, and has co-authored a research design textbook titled, "Research Design in Counseling.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>According to the Society of Counseling Psychology website, &ldquo;Fellowship is an honor bestowed upon members who have made &lsquo;unusual and outstanding contributions or performance in the field of psychology.&rsquo; Their contributions are viewed as having enriched or advanced Counseling Psychology well beyond the level that normally would be expected of a professional psychologist. Fellows are selected by peers on the basis of evidence of sustained superior performance that is recognizable at a national (rather than local or regional) level.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:6881c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/06/28/summer-2019-edition-of-learning-connections-now-available-online Summer 2019 edition of Learning Connections now available onlineThe latest edition of Learning Connections, an alumni news magazine from the UW-Madison School of Education, is now available online. The ​Summer 2019 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students, and alumni. The cover stories are focused on Connecting with Community, and the School's efforts to explore new possibilities, engage diverse voices, and improve lives.Fri, 28 Jun 2019 11:01:00 Z<p>The latest edition of <strong><em>Learning Connections</em></strong>, an alumni news magazine from the UW-Madison School of Education, is <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections" title="Check out the online edition of Learning Connections" target="_blank">now available online</a>.<br /> <br /> The ​Summer 2019 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students, and alumni. <br /> <br /> The cover stories are focused on Connecting with Community, and the School's efforts to explore new possibilities, engage diverse voices, and improve lives.<br /> <br /> A pdf of the latest print edition of Learning Connections is&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/docs/WebDispenser/news-connections-pdf/final-lc-summer-19-pdf-for-web.pdf?sfvrsn=4" title="View a pdf of the Summer 2019 Learning Connections" target="_blank">available here</a>.</p> <h3>Summer 2019 edition highlights include:</h3> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/message-from-the-dean" title="Read the message from the Dean" target="_blank">Message&nbsp;from the Dean</a>: Diana Hess highlights the value of community</p> <p>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/enright-forgiveness" title="Learn about Enright's Forgiveness work" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Robert Enright travels globe spreading news about his groundbreaking forgiveness work<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/original-warrior-exhibit" title="Learn about the Original Warrior exhibit" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Toms Jones and John Hitchcock share their perspectives via their work being featured in the 'Original Warrior' exhibit at the National Veterans Art Museum<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/closing-remarks" title="Hear from some graduating students" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Closing Remarks from 2019 spring graduates<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/additional-voices-highlights" title="Learn more" target="_blank">Voices</a>: Additional highlights<br /> <br /> <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/docs/WebDispenser/news-connections-pdf/final-lc-summer-19-pdf-for-web.pdf?sfvrsn=4" title="View a pdf of the print Learning Connections" target="_blank"><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/learning-connections-summer-2019-cover-350-px.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Cover of the Summer 2019 Learning Connections" title="Learning Connections Summer 2019 Cover 350 px" class="FloatImageRight" /></a>&bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/evaluation-and-policy-clinics" title="Read the cover story about the evaluation and policy clinics" target="_blank">Connecting with Community</a>: Evaluation and policy clinics give graduate students such as Anthony Hernandez (on the cover of this issue of&nbsp;<em>Learning Connections</em>) opportunities to build partnerships and connect research to practice<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/seed-grant-planted-in-rural-healthcare-facility" title="Learn about this Seed Grant project" target="_blank">Connecting with Community</a>: Wisconsin Idea Seed grant ​connects university's autism experts and graduate students with rural healthcare facility<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/black-arts-matter-festival" title="Read about the Black Arts Matter Festival" target="_blank">Connecting with Community</a>: Undergraduate Shasparay Lighteard launches arts festival to celebrate black artists and build community<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/news-and-notes" title="Check out the latest news and notes" target="_blank">News and Notes</a>: Check out a range of highlights from across the School during this past academic year<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/media-mentions" title="Check out a sampling of media mentions" target="_blank">Media Mentions</a>: ​Learn about ​some of the media outlets putting the spotlight on, and utilizing the expertise of, faculty, staff and alumni associated with the School<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/wei-lab" title="Learn about this Wei LAB project" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: Wei LAB, led by Jerlando Jackson, is partnering with Nehemiah to examine ways to reduce health disparities in African-American communities<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/sstar-lab" title="Learn about the SSTAR Lab" target="_blank">Innovation</a>: Student outcomes data crunchers brought into UW&ndash;Madison's financial aid office with launch of Associate Professor Nicholas Hillman's SSTAR Lab<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/mansfield-hall" title="Read about Mansfield Hall" target="_blank">Spotlight</a>: UW&ndash;Madison alums Perry and Sean LaRoque launch Mansfield Hall, a living and learning community that helps students with diverse needs realize their goals<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/buff-brennan" title="Read about Buff Brennan's commitment to Dance" target="_blank">Spotlight:</a> Learn how Buff Brennan has spent her career encouraging and supporting dance students<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/aera-2019" title="Check out highlights from AERA 2019" target="_blank">Badgers shine at #AERA19</a><br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/alumni-breakouts" title="Learn about these alumni" target="_blank">Alumni breakouts</a><br /> &nbsp;<br /> &bull;&nbsp;<a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2019-summer/class-notes" title="Read about updates our alumni sent in" target="_blank">Class notes</a>: Check out what your fellow School of Education alumni are up to</p>urn:uuid:e36fc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/06/27/frost--andrae-participate-in-the-health-equity-leadership-institute Frost, Andrae participate in the Health Equity Leadership InstituteUW-Madison’s Nick Frost and Susan Andrae participated in the Collaborative Center for Health Equity’s (CCHE) Health Equity Leadership Institute (HELI), which took place June 17-21. Frost is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. Andrae is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. Thu, 27 Jun 2019 09:20:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Nick Frost and Susan Andrae participated in the <a href="https://ictr.wisc.edu/cche/" title="CCHE home page" target="_blank">Collaborative Center for Health Equity&rsquo;s (CCHE)</a> <a href="https://ictr.wisc.edu/program/health-equity-leadership-institute-heli/" title="HELI info page" target="_blank">Health Equity Leadership Institute (HELI)</a>, which took place June 17-21.&nbsp;</p> <p>Frost is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/Feeds/counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>, while&nbsp;Andrae is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/" title="Kinesiology home page" target="_blank">Department of Kinesiology</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>HELI is an intensive, weeklong career development opportunity. Dozens of researchers were selected through a competitive national application process to participate in this program. <br /> <br /> This institute aims to help increase the number of minority researchers investigating health disparities and health equity, as well as facilitate professional networking for participating scholars.</p> <p>In addition to the CCHE, HELI is also hosted by the Maryland Center for Health Equity in the School of Public Health at University of Maryland, College Park.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Reception speakers included Robert N. Golden, dean of UW-Madison's&nbsp;<a href="https://www.med.wisc.edu/" title="Med School website" target="_blank">School of Medicine and Public Health</a> and vice chancellor for medical affairs; Patrick Sims, deputy vice chancellor for diversity and inclusion, vice provost and chief diversity officer at UW-Madison; and Mona Found, senior associate dean, diversity and inclusion at University of Alabama at Birmingham.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:2865c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/06/11/uw-madison-alum-scull-featured-in-monitor-on-psychology-report-on-psychologists-working-abroad UW-Madison alum Scull featured in Monitor on Psychology report on psychologists working abroadUW-Madison alumnus Nick Scull was featured in a recent report from Monitor on Psychology magazine that puts a spotlight on various professionals working abroad. After earning his degree, Scull secured a job as the first psychologist at Fawzia Sultan Healthcare Network in Kuwait, a nonprofit clinic that serves children, adolescents, and adults.Tue, 11 Jun 2019 09:57:00 Z<p>UW-Madison alumnus Nick Scull was featured in a recent report from Monitor on Psychology magazine that puts a spotlight on various professionals working abroad.</p> <p>Scull earned his Ph.D. from the School of Education&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://health.soe.wisc.edu/about/academic-departments/counseling-psychology/" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>&nbsp;in 2009. Now, Scull is applying what he learned to his work in Kuwait with Arab and Muslim communities.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/default-album/uw-alum-monitor-in-psychology.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Nick Scull is featured on the cover of Monitor on Psychology" displaymode="Original" title="UW Alum Monitor in Psychology" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">UW&ndash;Madison alum Nick Scull is featured on the cover<br /> of Monitor on Psychology.</figcaption> </figure> </div> After earning his degree, Scull secured a job as the first psychologist at Fawzia Sultan Healthcare Network, a nonprofit clinic that serves children, adolescents, and adults. Though at the time he was one of only four. U.S.-licensed psychologists in the country, Monitor on Psychology reports that Scull has succeeded in launching and directing a department of mental health and wellness. Mental health care carries a strong stigma in Kuwait, according to the report, yet Scull has seen an uptick in patients seeking care for mental health concerns since he arrived.</p> <p>In addition to the stigma of mental health, Scull has often to face other obstacles while practicing in Kuwait. He tells the publication that there is a lack of infrastructure when it comes to situations like domestic violence and child abuse, often making him feel helpless to aid his patients.</p> <p>Despite the difficulties, Scull reports to Monitor on Psychology that his work has been highly rewarding.</p> <p>Monitor on Psychology is a publication of the American Psychological Association (APA). Read the full report&nbsp;<a href="https://www.apa.org/monitor/2019/05/cover-expat-life" target="_blank" title="View the online version of the report here">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:6c5ec237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/05/11/school-of-education-honors-spring-2019-graduates School of Education honors Spring 2019 graduatesUW-Madison's School of Education put a spotlight on its newest class of graduates by hosting two major events at the Gordon Dining and Event Center. On Friday evening, May 10, the School honored its Spring 2019 Ph.D. and master of fine arts degree recipients during a traditional hooding ceremony. And on Saturday morning, May 11, the School celebrated with its latest class of bachelor’s and master’s degree recipients during the annual Pre-Commencement Celebration. Congratulations and best of luck to all of our graduates! And remember: You may no longer be a student, but you’ll always be a Badger!Sat, 11 May 2019 16:01:00 Z<p>UW-Madison's School of Education put a spotlight on its newest class of graduates by hosting two major events at the Gordon Dining and Event Center.</p> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/commencement-2019.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Pre-Commencement Celebration" title="Commencement 2019" class="FloatImageRight" />On Friday evening, May 10, the School honored its Spring 2019 Ph.D. and master of fine arts degree recipients during a traditional hooding ceremony. Bucky Badger stopped in to salute our new alums and check out the scene before Dean Diana Hess welcomed and congratulated this newest cohort of #UWGrads. </p> <p>And on Saturday morning, May 11, the School celebrated with its latest class of bachelor&rsquo;s and master&rsquo;s degree recipients during the annual Pre-Commencement Celebration. Before everyone headed over to Camp Randall Stadium for UW-Madison&rsquo;s Spring 2019 Commencement Ceremony, students enjoyed breakfast with faculty and staff, family and friends, hung out with Bucky Badger, and heard from Hess.</p> <p>Congratulations and best of luck to all of our graduates!</p> <p>And remember: You may no longer be a student, but you&rsquo;ll always be a Badger!</p> Make sure and check out photo galleries of the big day that are posted to the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.facebook.com/UWMadisonEducation" target="_blank" title="Visit the School's Facebook Page">School of Education&rsquo;s Facebook Page</a>.<br /> <br /> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/pre-commencement-celebration-2.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Pre-Commencement celebration" title="Pre-Commencement Celebration 2" class="FloatImageLeft" />urn:uuid:c35bc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/05/05/alum-mcdowell-awarded-madison-college-s-2019-distinguished-faculty-award Alum McDowell awarded Madison College's 2019 Distinguished Faculty AwardUW-Madison alumnus Brad McDowell has been awarded the 2019 Distinguished Faculty Award from Madison College (Madison Area Technical College). This award is given to a single individual every year, selected by a student vote. McDowell earned his master’s degree from the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology in 1992. McDowell is a full-time faculty member at Madison College, where he instructs in psychology.Sun, 05 May 2019 10:11:00 Z<p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/brad-mcdowell.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Brad McDowell" displaymode="Original" title="Brad McDowell" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">McDowell </figcaption> </figure> </div> UW-Madison alumnus Brad McDowell has been awarded the 2019 Distinguished Faculty Award from Madison College (Madison Area Technical College).<br /> <br /> This award is given to a single individual every year, selected by a student vote.</p> <p>McDowell earned his master&rsquo;s degree from the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a> in 1992.</p> <p>McDowell is a full-time faculty member at Madison College, where he instructs in psychology. He also serves as a mental strength program instructor for Madison College&rsquo;s athletic department, is a faculty tutor in the Student Achievement Center, and is a faculty fellow for the MATC Center for International Education.</p>urn:uuid:a154c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/04/24/budge-receiving-2019-honorary-rainbow-degree-from-the-gender-and-sexuality-campus-center Budge receiving 2019 Honorary Rainbow Degree from the Gender and Sexuality Campus CenterUW-Madison’s Stephanie Budge is receiving the 2019 Honorary Rainbow Degree from the Gender and Sexuality Campus Center (GSCC). Budge is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology and head of the Trans Research Lab (TRL). Her research and activism efforts focus on transgender and gender diverse people. Budge will receive her Honorary Rainbow Degree on May 9 at a ceremony and reception held at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery.Wed, 24 Apr 2019 09:44:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Stephanie Budge is receiving the 2019 Honorary Rainbow Degree from the <a href="https://lgbt.wisc.edu/" title="GSCC website" target="_blank">Gender and Sexuality Campus Center (GSCC)</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/budge-200-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Budge" displaymode="Original" title="Budge 200 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Budge </figcaption> </figure> </div> Budge is an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych Dept. home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a> and head of the <a href="https://trl.education.wisc.edu/" title="TRL website" target="_blank">Trans Research Lab (TRL)</a>. Her research and activism efforts focus on transgender and gender diverse people.&nbsp;</p> <p>The GSCC, founded to honor faculty, staff, or community members who have been a strong partner to their mission, unanimously chose Budge to receive this award. She is being recognized for her work championing and advocating for and with TBLGQ+ students and staff at UW-Madison.</p> <p>Budge will receive her Honorary Rainbow Degree on May 9 at a ceremony and reception held at the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery.</p>urn:uuid:3952c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/04/19/school-of-education-recognizes-2019-distinguished-achievement-award-winners School of Education recognizes 2019 Distinguished Achievement Award winnersThe UW-Madison School of Education's highly regarded national reputation is due, in large part, to the dedication and talent of its faculty, staff, and students. Each spring, the School recognizes some of its most outstanding individuals with Faculty and Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards. On Thursday evening, this year’s award-winners were honored during a reception and short ceremony in the Education Building’s Wisconsin Idea room.Fri, 19 Apr 2019 14:50:46 Z<p>The UW-Madison School of Education's highly regarded national reputation is due, in large part, to the dedication and talent of its faculty, staff, and students.</p> <p>Each spring, the School recognizes some of its most outstanding individuals with Faculty and Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards. On Thursday evening, this year&rsquo;s award-winners were honored during a reception and short ceremony in the Education Building&rsquo;s Wisconsin Idea room.</p> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/2019-awards.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="2019 award winners" title="2019 Awards" class="FloatImageRight" />To view photos of Thursday&rsquo;s reception, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/UWMadisonEducation/" title="Visit Facebook to view more photos" target="_blank">visit the School's Facebook Page</a>.</p> <p><strong>The 2019 award winners are:<br /> </strong></p> <h5>ANN WALLACE ACADEMIC STAFF DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT</h5> Todd Finkelmeyer, Communications and Advancement<br /> <p>Jason Ruhl, Tandem Press</p> <h5>UNIVERSITY STAFF DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT </h5> <p>Jeff Wunderlin, Education Academic Services<br /> Mary Hegge (Claire Shaffer Award), Wisconsin Center for Education Research&nbsp;</p> <h5>FACULTY DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENT </h5> <p>Ruth Benedict, Kinesiology (occupational therapy program)<br /> Kate Corby, Dance</p> <h5>DICK &amp; JULIE DALY EDUCATION STUDENT STAFF ACHIEVEMENT </h5> <p>Nasitta Keita, Morgridge Center for Public Service</p> <h5>COMMUNITY-ENGAGED SCHOLARSHIP</h5> <p>Erica Halverson, Curriculum and Instruction</p> <h5>EXCELLENCE IN DIVERSITY </h5> <p>Stephanie Graham, Counseling Psychology&nbsp; <br /> <br /> <em>The School would like to thank the following alumni and friends for making this event possible. The Ann Wallace Academic Staff Distinguished Achievement awards are sponsored by Ann Wallace. The Claire Shaffer Award is made possible by a generous gift from Claire and Ron Shaffer. The Faculty Achievement awards are supported by the Charles Read Recognition Fund. The Student Staff Award is made possible by a gift from Jo Ann Carr. The Excellence in Diversity Award and Community-Engaged Scholarship Award are supported by gifts from the Luvern and Marguerite Kopp Fund.</em>&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:1a4fc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/04/17/her--lee-johnson-chosen-for-2019-cohort-of-uw-madison-s-bouchet-graduate-honor-society Her, Lee-Johnson chosen for 2019 cohort of UW-Madison's Bouchet Graduate Honor SocietyThe Graduate School has selected five scholars — including two from the School of Education — for the 2019 cohort of the UW-Madison Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. Pa Her is a Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Counseling Psychology, and Jamila Lee-Johnson is a Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.The Bouchet Society provides scholars with a network of peers who exemplify character, leadership, scholarship, service, and advocacy for those who have been traditionally underrepresented in the academy.Wed, 17 Apr 2019 10:44:00 Z<p>The Graduate School has selected five scholars &mdash; including two from the School of Education &mdash; for the 2019 cohort of the UW-Madison Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society.</p> <p>The Bouchet Society provides scholars with a network of peers who exemplify character, leadership, scholarship, service, and advocacy for those who have been traditionally underrepresented in the academy.</p> <p>The 2019 class of Bouchet scholars was inducted into the UW-Madison chapter at a ceremony on April 2. The scholars then attended the Bouchet National Induction Ceremony and Annual conference April 5-6.</p> <p>Pa Her and Jamila Lee-Johnson, both graduate students with the School of Education, were selected as Bouchet scholars. </p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/pa-her-200x300.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Pa Her" displaymode="Original" title="Pa-Her-200x300" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Her </figcaption> </figure> </div> Her, who is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Counseling Psychology, is passionate about working with underrepresented college students. Her research focuses on the experiences of students of color in higher education, specifically in areas such as persistence, vocational development, social class, self-efficacy, and racial discrimination. </p> <p>While working as an academic advisor with the Center for Academic Excellence assisting underrepresented students transition to UW-Madison, she was also the student lead on the Hmong Research Team through the Department of Counseling Psychology. In addition to her work on campus, Her&rsquo;s research projects have led to eight peer-reviewed publications, a three-year research intervention program designed for Hmong parents, and more than 17 peer-reviewed presentations.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/jamila-lee-johnson-200x300.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Jamila Lee-Johnson" displaymode="Original" title="Jamila-Lee-Johnson-200x300" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Lee-Johnson </figcaption> </figure> </div> A Ph.D. candidate with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, Lee-Johnson is an education scholar who utilizes critical theories and methods to disrupt the narrative around students of color. In her research, she focuses on the success of students of color in college. </p> <p>Currently, Lee-Johnson is engaging with research projects on black women&rsquo;s leadership experiences at historically black colleges and universities, mentoring practices that foster success for students of color in their transition into graduate programs, and how to conduct research in critical ways that humanize students of color as study participants. </p> <p>Lee-Johnson recently published a co-edited book, &ldquo;Critical Theory and Qualitative Data Analysis in Education,&rdquo; which illustrates what critical theory is, identifies the missing link behind critical theory and research, and discusses how to apply critical theories in qualitative data analysis in education. <br /> <br /> To read about all members of the 2019 cohort of the UW-Madison Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society, check out <a href="https://grad.wisc.edu/2019/03/13/meet-the-2019-bouchet-society-inductees/" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">this report from the Graduate School</a>.</p>urn:uuid:374fc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/04/15/charleston-named-school-of-education-s-associate-dean-for-diversity-and-inclusion Charleston named School of Education’s associate dean for diversity and inclusionLaVar Charleston was recently named the School of Education’s first associate dean for diversity and inclusion, a position he is starting on June 16. In this role, Charleston will serve on the dean’s leadership team and will lead the creation of a new School of Education Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Charleston, an alumnus of UW–Madison’s School of Education, has served since the summer of 2017 as UW–Whitewater’s assistant vice chancellor of student diversity, engagement, and success.Mon, 15 Apr 2019 10:30:00 Z<p>LaVar Charleston was recently named the School of Education&rsquo;s first associate dean for diversity and inclusion, a position he is starting on June 16.</p> <p>In this role, Charleston will serve on the dean&rsquo;s leadership team and will lead the creation of a new School of Education Office of Diversity and Inclusion.</p> <p>&ldquo;We are thrilled that Dr. Charleston is joining the School of Education as the inaugural associate dean for diversity and inclusion,&rdquo; says School of Education Dean Diana Hess, who holds the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education. &ldquo;He is a dynamic and thoughtful leader with just the right mix of extensive experience and exceptional skills to lead the development of the new office of Diversity and Inclusion."</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/lavar-charleston-250-px-sq-head-shot.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="LaVar Charleston" displaymode="Original" title="LaVar Charleston 250 px SQ head shot" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Charleston </figcaption> </figure> </div> Charleston, an alumnus of UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education, has served since the summer of 2017 as UW&ndash;Whitewater&rsquo;s assistant vice chancellor of student diversity, engagement, and success.</p> <p>In his new position, Charleston will be providing leadership to faculty, staff, and students in developing and implementing strategic initiatives that promote the School of Education and UW-Madison's mission for diversity, equity, and inclusion. Similarly, he will lead efforts to implement and review diversity-related policies and procedures that support School of Education programming and planning to foster a diverse and inclusive community.</p> <p>&ldquo;It is an honor to return to the School of Education that has poured so much into me when I was an early career scholar engaged in critical concepts of equity, diversity, and inclusion within higher education,&rdquo; says Charleston. &ldquo;I appreciate the vision of Dean Hess to incorporate Inclusive Excellence into the fabric of all of our programs, policies, and practices. As my entire career within higher education has been dedicated to creating equitable and inclusive working and learning environments, I look forward to instituting what I&rsquo;ve learned throughout the years to contribute to the inclusive dynamism of the School of Education&rsquo;s students, staff, faculty, and overall community.&rdquo;</p> <p>Prior to his work at UW&ndash;Whitewater, Charleston from 2012 to 2017 was part of the team that helped launch Wisconsin&rsquo;s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory (Wei LAB), which promotes equitable environments for learning and working in higher education. The Wei LAB is housed in the School of Education&rsquo;s Wisconsin Center for Education Research. At the time he was hired by UW&ndash;Whitewater, Charleston was serving as assistant director and a senior research associate of the Wei Lab, and serving as the coordinator for the lab&rsquo;s research and evaluation division.</p> <p>Charleston, who lettered in football as an undergraduate at Ball State University, also helped to develop Beyond the Game, a curriculum that helps student-athletes plan for careers outside professional sports. The program, which has been used at UW&ndash;Madison, was designed to help African American, male college athletes more strongly identify with the academic side of their student experience.</p> <p>Charleston received both his master&rsquo;s degree (2007) and Ph.D. (2010) from the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. He also taught courses on leadership and intersecting identities for that department.</p> <p>Charleston is an expert in the kinds of support students need to stay enrolled and succeed in college and in how to help them prepare for graduate school. He has also studied how to motivate more students from underrepresented groups toward career paths in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.</p> <p>In February, the Wisconsin Alumni Association presented Charleston with a 2019 Forward Under 40 Award, which honors UW&ndash;Madison alumni under the age of 40 who are living the Wisconsin Idea, leveraging the benefits of their education to better their cities, states, nation, and even the world. Charleston was recognized for making waves of change, with colleges and universities at home and abroad looking to him for his voice and award-winning scholarship exploring how more students can access higher education.</p>urn:uuid:c941c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/03/26/school-announces-faculty-and-staff-distinguished-achievement-award-winners School announces Faculty and Staff Distinguished Achievement Award winnersUW-Madison’s School of Education and many of its programs are widely regarded as being among the very best in the nation. The many committed and accomplished faculty and staff working across the School are a key to this success. In an effort to recognize some of these talented individuals, the School administers Faculty and Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards. On Thursday evening, April 18, Dean Diana Hess will lead the annual awards ceremony to honor this year’s recipients. On Thursday evening, April 18, Dean Diana Hess will lead the annual awards ceremony to honor this year’s recipients. Please join us for the awards ceremony and reception, which begins at 4 p.m. in the Education Building’s Wisconsin Idea Room. The program begins at 4:45 p.m.Tue, 26 Mar 2019 10:49:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s School of Education and many of its programs are widely regarded as being among the very best in the nation.</p> <p>The many committed and accomplished faculty and staff working across the School are a key to this success.</p> <p>In an effort to recognize some of these talented individuals, the School administers Faculty and Staff Distinguished Achievement Awards. On Thursday evening, April 18, Dean Diana Hess will lead the annual awards ceremony to honor this year&rsquo;s recipients.</p> <p>Please join us for the awards ceremony and reception, which begins at 4 p.m. in the Education Building&rsquo;s Wisconsin Idea Room. The program begins at 4:45 p.m.</p> <h3>This year&rsquo;s award winners are:</h3> <p><strong>Ann Wallace Academic Staff Distinguished Achievement<br /> </strong>Todd Finkelmeyer, Communications and Advancement<br /> Jason Ruhl, Tandem Press</p> <p><strong>University Staff Distinguished Achievement<br /> </strong>Jeff Wunderlin, Education Academic Services<br /> Mary Hegge [Claire Shaffer Award], Wisconsin Center for Education Research<br /> <br /> <strong>Faculty Distinguished Achievement<br /> </strong>Ruth Benedict, Department of Kinesiology (OT program)<br /> Kate Corby, Dance Department</p> <p> <strong>Dick &amp; Julie Daly Education Student Staff Achievement<br /> </strong>Nasitta Keita, Morgridge Center for Public Service</p> <p><strong>Community-Engaged Scholarship</strong><br /> Erica Halverson, Department of Curriculum and Instruction</p> <p><strong>Excellence in Diversity</strong><br /> Stephanie Graham, Department of Counseling Psychology</p>urn:uuid:bf3ac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/03/25/goldberg-speaks-with-nature-medicine-about-mental-health-apps--unlicensed-therapists Goldberg speaks with Nature Medicine about mental health apps, unlicensed therapistsA recent ​report from Nature Medicine features the expertise of UW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg, an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. Nature Medicine’s article, “Mental health apps lean on bots and unlicensed therapists,” explores the new trend for app-based mental health care. Nature Medicine points to a study from Goldberg, who notes that his research, published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology, doesn’t really support the idea that non-licensed individuals can be effective providers of therapy.Mon, 25 Mar 2019 10:03:00 Z<p>A recent ​report from Nature Medicine features the expertise of UW-Madison&rsquo;s Simon Goldberg.&nbsp;</p> <p>Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>, and he is an affiliate with the university&rsquo;s <a href="https://centerhealthyminds.org" title="Center for Healthy Minds website" target="_blank">Center for Healthy Minds</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/simon-goldberg-250-px-sq.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Simon Goldberg" displaymode="Original" title="Simon Goldberg 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Goldberg </figcaption> </figure> </div> Nature Medicine&rsquo;s article, &ldquo;Mental health apps lean on bots and unlicensed therapists,&rdquo; explores the new trend for app-based mental health care, such as Sibly. Sibly&rsquo;s goal is to provide accessible, affordable, and effective mental health care through smartphone capabilities. Rather than licensed therapists, this app and similar programs rely on a group of nonlicensed "coaches" to help their client.&nbsp;</p> <p>According to Nature Medicine, one in four people will be affected by a mental or neurological condition during their lives, but two-thirds of this group will never seek help from a professional therapist. Even those who are motivated to find professional help won&rsquo;t necessarily receive it.&nbsp;</p> <p>Nature Medicine points to a study from Goldberg, who notes that his research, published in the&nbsp;Journal of Counseling Psychology, doesn&rsquo;t really support the idea that non-licensed individuals can be effective providers of therapy.</p> <p>To learn much more about this nuanced topic, check out the entire Nature Medicine report <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/d41591-019-00009-6#ref-CR9" title="Nature Medicine's article" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:9539c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/03/21/on-wisconsin-magazine-spotlights-counseling-psychology-s-diversity-dialogues-program On Wisconsin magazine spotlights Counseling Psychology's Diversity Dialogues programOn Wisconsin, UW-Madison’s alumni magazine, posted a cover story headlined, “Room for Debate: In a polarized world, UW-Madison fosters tough conversations.” Luckily, though, many at UW-Madison are actively seeking, encouraging, and developing the ability to discuss difficult topics — and not just politics. Among those featured is the Diversity Dialogues work of the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. Thu, 21 Mar 2019 11:04:00 Z<p>On Wisconsin, UW-Madison&rsquo;s alumni magazine, posted a cover story headlined, &ldquo;Room for Debate: In a polarized world, UW-Madison fosters tough conversations.&rdquo;</p> <p>Research shows that, for the first time in more than two decades, members of both political parties have strongly unfavorable opinions of their opponents. Often, people end up congregating almost exclusively with others who share the same demographic profiles.</p> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/on-wisconsin.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Cover of On, Wisconsin" title="On Wisconsin" class="FloatImageRight" />Luckily, though, many at UW-Madison are actively seeking, encouraging, and developing the ability to discuss difficult topics &mdash; and not just politics. &nbsp;</p> <p>Among those featured is the work of the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>Started almost 15 years ago, the Department of Counseling Psychology implemented a program to foster greater equality, inclusion, and understanding across differences. Diversity Dialogues was originally made to address regional differences between students; it now is used as a conversational platform for students from different racial, ethnic, gender, and class backgrounds.</p> <p>Steve Quintana, a professor with the Department of Counseling Psychology and the director of Diversity Dialogues, tells On Wisconsin that the primary objective of this group is to help students recognize that all people are &ldquo;living rich, interesting, and complex lives.&rdquo;</p> <p>Quintana and others act as facilitators, giving participants different cues and helping to maintain a respectful balance. The cues ask participants to share experiences with the group, like describing pivotal childhood experiences, or their own negative or positive experiences of diversity. A running rule is that no one can interrupt whoever is speaking for at least 90 seconds.&nbsp;</p> <p>Participants later shared with Quintana that engaging in Diversity Dialogues made them feel more flexible and open. Quintana tells On Wisconsin that &ldquo;windows into the depths of people&rsquo;s experience is rewarding.&rdquo;</p> <p>Read the full story <a href="https://onwisconsin.uwalumni.com/features/room-for-debate/ " title="On Wisconsin story" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:c73ac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/03/18/goldberg-authors-paper-examining-treatment-delay-among-pre--and-post-9-11-veterans Goldberg authors paper examining treatment delay among pre- and post-9/11 veteransUW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg is the lead author on a new paper examining treatment delay among post-9/11 veterans vs. pre-9/11 veterans and civilians. This work was published by the journal Psychiatric Services Today. Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology, and he is an affiliate with the university’s Center for Healthy Minds. Mon, 18 Mar 2019 11:07:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Simon Goldberg is the lead author on a new paper examining treatment delay among post-9/11 veterans vs. pre-9/11 veterans and civilians.&nbsp;</p> <p>This work was published by the journal Psychiatric Services Today and is titled,&nbsp;"Mental Health Treatment Delay: A Comparison Among Civilians and Veterans of Different Service Eras."</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/simon-goldberg-250-px-sq.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Simon Goldberg" displaymode="Original" title="Simon Goldberg 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Goldberg </figcaption> </figure> </div> Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://ci.education.wisc.edu/" title="CI Dept. home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>, and he is an affiliate with the university&rsquo;s <a href="https://centerhealthyminds.org/" title="Venter for Healthy Minds website" target="_blank">Center for Healthy Minds</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>Goldberg&rsquo;s study compared delay of treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder, and alcohol use disorder among post-9/11 veterans versus pre-9/11 veterans and civilians by examining surveys on alcohol and related conditions.&nbsp;</p> <p>He found that post-9/11 veterans were less likely to delay treatment for PTSD and depression than pre-9/11 veterans and civilians. However, no differences were observed in treatment delay for alcohol use disorder. Some of the delays varied based on military health care coverage.&nbsp;</p> <p>Goldberg's paper concludes that the difference in treatment delay may reflect efforts to engage recent veterans in mental health care. He suggests that universally low initiation of treatment for alcohol use disorder may require further engagement.&nbsp;</p> <p>Read Goldberg's study <a href="https://ps.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ps.201800444" title="Goldberg's Study" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:dc3ac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/03/12/uw-madison-ties-for-no--1-ranking-among-public-schools-of-education UW–Madison ties for No. 1 ranking among public schools of educationU.S. News and World Report released its 2020 Best Education Graduate Schools rankings on March 12, and UW-Madison is home to the highest-rated public school of education in the nation, a distinction it is sharing this year with the University of California-Los Angeles. UW–Madison’s School of Education is No. 3 overall, trailing only Ivy League privates Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania. UW–Madison, UCLA, and Stanford University all tied for the No. 3 spot. In addition, UW–Madison’s School of Education is also home to nine specialty programs ranked among the top 10 in the nation — including the top-ranked program in rehabilitation counseling.Tue, 12 Mar 2019 09:02:46 Z<p>The UW&ndash;Madison School of Education and many of its programs continue to be recognized as being among the very best in the nation. </p> <p>U.S. News and World Report released its <a href="https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-education-schools" title="View the rankings at usnews.com" target="_blank">2020 Best Education Graduate Schools rankings</a> on March 12, and UW-Madison is home to the highest-rated public school of education in the nation, a distinction it is sharing this year with the University of California-Los Angeles. </p> <p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education is No. 3 overall, trailing only Ivy League privates Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania. UW&ndash;Madison, UCLA, and Stanford University all tied for the No. 3 spot.</p> <p>This marks the 20th time in the past 21 years that UW-Madison has maintained a top-10 ranking among all schools of education.</p> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/soerank2020_sitefinity-350x528.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="UW-Madison tied for top public school ranking by U.S. News 2020" title="SoERank2020_Sitefinity 350x528" class="FloatImageRight" />&ldquo;It is an honor to again be recognized as one of the finest schools of education by U.S. News and World Report,&rdquo; says UW-Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess, the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education. &ldquo;While these rankings are but one measure, they are special because they recognize the collective contributions of our many talented and dedicated faculty and staff. The depth of our highly regarded programs is a great strength of ours.&rdquo;</p> <p>In addition to this overall rank, UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education is also home to nine specialty programs ranked among the top 10 in the nation &mdash; including the top-ranked program in rehabilitation counseling, which is housed within the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.</p> <p>"We are honored and humbled by such a prestigious recognition,&rdquo; says UW-Madison Associate Professor Melinda Leko, who chairs the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. &ldquo;It is a testament to the dedication and excellence exemplified by our faculty, staff, students, and alumni who are working tirelessly every day to improve outcomes for individuals with disabilities within our society.&rdquo;</p> <p>According to these latest rankings, the UW&ndash;Madison School of Education is home to top-10 programs in the following specialty areas: </p> <p><strong>&bull;&nbsp;No. 1 &mdash;</strong>&nbsp;Rehabilitation Counseling</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 2 &mdash;</strong> Curriculum and Instruction</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 2 &mdash;</strong> Educational Administration and Supervision</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 2 &mdash;</strong> Educational Psychology</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 3 &mdash;</strong> Education Policy</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 3 &mdash;</strong> Student Counseling and Personnel Services</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 4 &mdash;</strong> Elementary Education</p> <p><strong>&bull;&nbsp;No. 5 &mdash;</strong> Secondary Education</p> <p><strong>&bull; No. 8 &mdash;</strong> Special Education </p> <p>UW-Madison also ranked 20th in the specialty area of Higher Education Administration.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageLeft"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/educbldg-doors-350-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Education Building" displaymode="Original" title="EducBldg doors 350 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">The UW&ndash;Madison School of Education has maintained a<br /> top-10 ranking among all schools of education 20 times in<br /> the past 21 years, according to U.S. News and World Report.</figcaption> </figure> </div> To calculate its overall 2020 Best Graduate School rankings, U.S. News explains that it sent surveys to 392 institutions granting doctoral degrees in the fall of 2018 and early 2019. Of those, 258 provided data needed to calculate rankings based on a weighted average of 10 measures. These measures include: peer assessments based on surveys filled out by education school deans and deans of graduate studies; professional assessments based on responses from school superintendents, school hiring contacts and professionals who hire people who graduate from graduate education programs; student selectivity measures, such as GRE scores and acceptance rates; faculty resource measures; and research activity. (<a href="https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/education-schools-methodology" title="learn more at usnews.com" target="_blank">View details about U.S. News' methodology here</a>.)</p> <p>These most recent overall rankings make UW-Madison home to the top-rated public school of education for the fifth time in the past six years.</p> <p>U.S. News explains that the education program specialty rankings are &ldquo;based solely on nominations by education school deans and education school deans of graduate studies from the list of schools surveyed.&rdquo; Those participating could select up to 10 top programs in each area. Similarly, the UW-Madison School of Education&rsquo;s top ranking in the <a href="https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-health-schools/rehabilitation-counseling-rankings" title="Learn more at usnews.com" target="_blank">Rehabilitation Counseling specialty area</a> came from surveys provided by program directors and faculty in health disciplines.</p> <p>Not all graduate programs are ranked by U.S. News &amp; World Report each year. For example, the School of Education&rsquo;s Art Department is home to the top-ranked printmaking program and the 15th-ranked fine arts program (as voted on by deans and department chairs in the fine arts). The Department of Kinesiology, meanwhile, houses the 14th-ranked occupational therapy program (as voted on by program directors and faculty in health disciplines). However, updated rankings in those areas were not included in U.S. News&rsquo; 2020 Best Graduate Schools rankings.</p>urn:uuid:f225c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/02/15/four-graduate-students-from-school-receiving-campus-wide-teaching-assistant-awards Four graduate students from School receiving Campus-Wide Teaching Assistant AwardsFour School of Education graduate students are receiving 2018 Campus-Wide Teaching Assistant Awards from UW-Madison. Those being recognized are: Alexandra Lakind, Joe Orovecz, Allison Murrow, and Adalbert Gerald Soosai Raj. Four School of Education graduate students are receiving 2018 Campus-Wide Teaching Assistant Awards. UW–Madison employs over 2,000 teaching assistants (TAs) across a wide range of disciplines where they are an integral part of the Wisconsin Experience. Their contributions to the classroom, lab, and field are essential to the university’s educational mission. Fri, 15 Feb 2019 12:07:00 Z<p>Four School of Education graduate students are receiving <a href="https://grad.wisc.edu/2019/02/11/2018-teaching-assistant-awards/" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">2018 Campus-Wide Teaching Assistant Awards</a>.<br /> <br /> UW&ndash;Madison employs over 2,000 teaching assistants (TAs) across a wide range of disciplines where they are an integral part of the Wisconsin Experience. Their contributions to the classroom, lab, and field are essential to the university&rsquo;s educational mission. <br /> <br /> To recognize the excellence of TAs across campus, the Graduate School supports the College of Letters &amp; Science in administering these awards. Honorees will receive their awards and celebrate with family and friends in a reception on Thursday, March 7 from 3 to 4 p.m. in 911 Van Vleck Hall.</p> <h3>Award winners from the School of Education are:&nbsp;</h3> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/alexandra-lakind.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Alexandra Lakind" title="Alexandra Lakind" class="FloatImageRight" />&bull; <strong>Alexandra Lakind </strong>is a recipient of the Early Excellence in Teaching Award. Lakind studies environmental education, arts programming, and childhood studies in the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://ci.education.wisc.edu" title="CI home page" target="_blank">Department of Curriculum and Instruction</a>.<br /> <br /> In teaching Green Screen: Environmental Perspectives through Film and&nbsp;Practicum in Early Childhood Education in Kindergarten, Lakind has drawn on her own experiences as a student to motivate herself as an educator. She says, &ldquo;The need I had for more engaging learning environments that attend to a greater diversity of learning styles has continued to energize me as an educator.&rdquo;</p> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/joe-orovecz.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Joe Orovecz" title="Joe Orovecz" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; <strong>Joe Orovecz</strong>, a Ph.D. candidate with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>, is receiving the Innovation in Teaching Award. Orovecz focuses primarily on crisis and suicide prevention and intervention, with an emphasis on LGBTQ+ issues. He says the most enjoyable part of teaching is seeing how a course can be transformative for students.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;There&rsquo;s something very special about the change that can happen for students and the broader community through learning, and I cherish being a part of that change,&rdquo; says Orovcz. Orovecz has taught multiple classes, including Supervised Internship in Counseling and Diagnosis and Treatment Planning for Counselors. He has also developed and taught a Psychology of Suicide course.</p> <p><strong><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/allison-murrow.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Allison Murrow" title="Allison Murrow" class="FloatImageRight" />&bull; Allison Murrow</strong> is being awarded the Capstone Ph.D. Teaching Award​. She is a fourth-year Ph.D. student with the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Her research specializes in the mitigation of classroom anxiety for teachers and students.<br /> <br /> She focuses on literacy, having taught The Teaching of Reading and Writing, Dimensions of Literacy, and The Teaching of Reading. Murrow says that she is dedicated not only to the outcomes of learning, but the process itself.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/adalbert-gerald-soosai-raj-headshot.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Adalbert Gerald Soosai Raj " title="Adalbert Gerald Soosai Raj Headshot" class="FloatImageLeft" />&bull; Also receiving the Capstone Ph.D. Teaching Award is <strong>Adalbert Gerald Soosai Raj</strong>, who is a Ph.D. student in computer sciences and education. In addition to teaching programming classes, he has taught courses like Intro to Operating Systems and Teaching Computer Science to K-12 Students.<br /> <br /> He says he is motivated by engaging and inspiring students, saying that many have declared a computer sciences majors after taking one of his courses.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:8922c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/02/15/uw-madison-s-goldberg-co-authors-study-reviewing-measures-for-tracking-symptoms-of-bipolar-disorder UW-Madison’s Goldberg co-authors study reviewing measures for tracking symptoms of bipolar disorderUW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg is a co-author of a new study that reviewed available measures for tracking symptoms of bipolar disorder as a means for improving outcomes in psychotherapy. The paper is titled “Systematic Review of Symptom Assessment Measures for Use in Measurement-Based Care of Bipolar Disorder,” and it appears in the journal Psychiatric Services. Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology, and he is an affiliate with the university’s Center for Healthy Minds.Fri, 15 Feb 2019 11:32:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Simon Goldberg is a co-author of a new study that reviewed available measures for tracking symptoms of bipolar disorder as a means for improving outcomes in psychotherapy.</p> <p>The paper is titled &ldquo;Systematic Review of Symptom Assessment Measures for Use in Measurement-Based Care of Bipolar Disorder,&rdquo; and it appears in the journal Psychiatric Services.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/simon-goldberg-250-px-sq.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Simon Goldberg" displaymode="Original" title="Simon Goldberg 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Goldberg </figcaption> </figure> </div> Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/Feeds/counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>, and he is an affiliate with the university&rsquo;s <a href="https://centerhealthyminds.org" title="Center for Healthy Minds website" target="_blank">Center for Healthy Minds</a>. The lead author on the report is Joseph Cerimele, a psychiatrist with the University of Washington&rsquo;s Medical Center and an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences.&nbsp;</p> <p>To understand how measures of symptoms could be used in measure-based care (MBC), the team of researchers conducted a systematic review of multiple databases to identify valid measures of symptoms. They used their findings to assess each measure&rsquo;s clinical utility.</p> <p>Given symptoms of bipolar disorder are complex and can change rapidly, the researchers are hopeful their review will provide clinicians with information about available measures and encourage their use in routine practice.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;Read the entire study <a title="BPD study " target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:0523c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/02/08/regents-approve-new-health-promotion-and-health-equity-degree-program Regents approve new health promotion and health equity degree programUW-Madison's new bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity (HPHE) program will be housed in the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. This program responds to student interest and employer demand for health-related expertise and health education careers, and will be run in collaboration with the School's Departments of Counseling Psychology, and Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education.Fri, 08 Feb 2019 15:50:36 Z<p>The University of Wisconsin System&rsquo;s Board of Regents voted Friday to approve a new undergraduate degree program at UW&ndash;Madison in health promotion and health equity. </p> <p>The development of the program responds to student interest and employer demand for health-related expertise and health education careers.</p> <p>The bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity (HPHE) will be housed in the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Kinesiology. The program will be run in collaboration with two other units within the School, the Department of Counseling Psychology and the Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. </p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/gary-diffee-250-px-sq.jpeg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Gary Diffee" displaymode="Original" title="Gary Diffee 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Diffee </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;The Department of Kinesiology is excited to be launching this venture,&rdquo; says Professor Gary Diffee, who chairs the department. &ldquo;This program will fill a real need to train students at the bachelor&rsquo;s degree level to immediately work in the growing fields of health education. Our collaboration with the departments of Counseling Psychology and Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education will allow us to offer students a holistic exposure to health education &mdash; focusing on the physical, the psychological and the socio-cultural aspects of health.&rdquo;</p> <p>This new major will launch with classes starting in September and will train students to practice as health educators. The program is broadly designed to provide students with the skills and perspectives to facilitate healthy practices at the individual and societal levels. Students will learn about the theoretical, programmatic and empirical foundations of health promotion and health equity interventions, and be taught to demonstrate competence in evaluating strengths and weaknesses in health promotion programs. </p> <p>The HPHE program &mdash; which is expected to enroll about 230 students by the 2022-23 academic year &mdash; also reflects a long-standing commitment by the School of Education to engage with disadvantaged communities, as graduates will be taught the skills to work effectively with diverse and underserved populations.</p> <p>The coursework will help prepare students for emerging career opportunities as health educators within: non-profit community health organizations; insurance companies; hospitals; mental health centers; senior care centers; home visitation programs; and governmental health offices. </p> <p>This undergraduate degree will be comprised of 120 credits, including 40 credits in the major. The core coursework includes a balanced focus on the interrelated areas of physical health, mental health, and disability. Elective curriculum will allow students to tailor the major in the direction of their personal interests.</p> <p>Students may enroll directly to the HPHE program as current UW-Madison students, or upon admission to the university as new freshmen or new transfer students. Typically, students will start the major in their second year, and remain enrolled through a third and fourth year.</p> <p><em>For more information about the bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity, email: <a href="mailto:HPHE@education.wisc.edu" title="Email the health promotion and health equity program">HPHE@education.wisc.edu</a></em></p> <div class="FloatImageLeft"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/kinesiology-lab-for-soe-site.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Kinesiology Lab" displaymode="Original" title="Kinesiology Lab for SoE Site" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">UW-Madison's new bachelor of science in health promotion and health equity (HPHE) program will be housed in the School of Education's Department of Kinesiology. This program responds to student interest and employer demand for health-related expertise and health education careers, and will be run in collaboration with the School's Departments of Counseling Psychology, and Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education. (<em>Photo: Sarah Maughan</em>)</figcaption> </figure> </div>urn:uuid:791ec237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/02/06/mind-and-life-blog-showcases-mindfulness-research-of-uw-madison-s-goldberg Mind and Life blog showcases mindfulness research of UW-Madison’s GoldbergThe Mind & Life Institute’s blog recently shared a post, titled “Meditation for Mental Health: How Does Mindfulness Compare to Other Treatments,” showcasing the research of UW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg. Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology, and he is an affiliate with the university’s Center for Healthy Minds. Mind & Life notes the exceptionalism of his work, saying few researchers undertake the challenge of analyzing impacts of mindfulness across the mental health field as a whole.Wed, 06 Feb 2019 11:01:00 Z<p>The Mind &amp; Life Institute&rsquo;s blog recently shared a post, titled &ldquo;Meditation for Mental Health: How Does Mindfulness Compare to Other Treatments,&rdquo; showcasing the research of UW-Madison&rsquo;s Simon Goldberg.</p> <p>Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/Feeds/counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>, and he is an affiliate with the university&rsquo;s <a href="https://centerhealthyminds.org" title="Center for Healthy Minds home page" target="_blank">Center for Healthy Minds</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/simon-goldberg-250-px-sq.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Simon Goldberg" displaymode="Original" title="Simon Goldberg 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Goldberg </figcaption> </figure> </div> Mind &amp; Life notes the exceptionalism of his work, saying few researchers undertake the challenge of analyzing impacts of mindfulness across the mental health field as a whole. Goldberg and his team of researchers did just that, conducting 142 clinical trials with over 12,000 participants.&nbsp;</p> <p>Through his arduous research process, Goldberg discovered mindfulness-based interventions were equivalent to existing evidence based-treatments in terms of effectiveness. He also discovered that mindfulness was superior to other comparisons, like no treatment and active controls. Mind &amp; Life reports that the strongest patterns of evidence was seen in the treatment of depression, pain, smoking, and addiction.</p> <p>This finding &ldquo;suggest that mindfulness be considered among various psychotherapeutic options," according to the blog post. Goldberg believes mindfulness is effective because of the way it targets emotional and cognitive mechanisms that are common in various psychiatric conditions. He says to Mind &amp; Life, "as people develop mindfulness skills, often through meditation, they're better equipped to break the habit of worrying and being fixated on a particular thought."<br /> <br /> Read Mind &amp; Life's blog post <a href="https://www.mindandlife.org/meditation-for-mental-health-how-does-mindfulness-compare-to-other-treatments/" title="Mind &amp; Life blog post" target="_blank">here</a>, and the original study <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272735817303847" title="Goldberg's original study" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:f71ac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2019/01/25/hess-co-chairing-uw-system-task-force-for-advancing-teachers-and-school-leaders Hess co-chairing UW System Task Force for Advancing Teachers and School LeadersUW-Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess is co-chairing a task force that’s designed to help identify how University of Wisconsin System institutions can better meet Wisconsin’s need for more teachers and school leaders. Hess is co-chairing this group with Deborah Kerr, president-elect of AASA, the national School Superintendents Association, and current superintendent of the Brown Deer School District. The UW System Task Force for Advancing Teachers and School Leaders in the State of Wisconsin was announced Jan. 25. The task force will have eight members in all and is to produce a report and recommendations by May 1, 2019, for presentation to the UW System Board of Regents Education Committee in June.Fri, 25 Jan 2019 17:09:34 Z<p>UW-Madison School of Education Dean Diana Hess is co-chairing a task force that&rsquo;s designed to help identify how University of Wisconsin System institutions can better meet Wisconsin&rsquo;s need for more teachers and school leaders.</p> <p>Hess is co-chairing this group with Deborah Kerr, president-elect of AASA, the national School Superintendents Association, and current superintendent of the Brown Deer School District.</p> <p>The UW System Task Force for Advancing Teachers and School Leaders in the State of Wisconsin was announced Friday ​in <a href="https://www.wisconsin.edu/news/archive/uw-system-studies-teacher-education-enrollments-incentives/" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">this news release</a>.&nbsp;The task force&nbsp;will have eight members in all and is to produce a report and recommendations by May 1, 2019, for presentation to the UW System Board of Regents Education Committee in June. </p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/diana_hess-fb-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Diana Hess" displaymode="Original" title="Diana_Hess-FB SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Hess </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;This task force is committed to working with stakeholders across Wisconsin to find innovative solutions aimed at addressing Wisconsin&rsquo;s teacher shortages,&rdquo; says Hess, who holds the Karen A. Falk Distinguished&nbsp;Chair&nbsp;of Education. &ldquo;We look forward to bringing together partners from the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Wisconsin&rsquo;s teacher preparation programs, and the vast PK-12 community to propose ways to increase access to teacher education and school leadership programs. High-quality educators are an investment in Wisconsin&rsquo;s future and serve as catalysts of opportunity by helping children in every corner of our state.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;All of our Wisconsin school children deserve to have the best and brightest teachers in their lives,&rdquo; Kerr says in the news release.&nbsp;&ldquo;We are looking forward to working collaboratively to identify best practices for teacher recruitment and retention and collectively create a plan of action.&nbsp;Our Wisconsin educational system can only&nbsp;continue to grow, thrive, and excel with a vibrant workforce.&rdquo;</p> <p>The UW System news release explains how, in June 2017, Regent Regina Millner started a discussion among the Board about the reduced enrollment at UW System Schools and Colleges of Education. This is leading to significant impacts on rural areas and in high-need subject areas. Over the past year, the Education Committee, which Millner chairs, heard from a variety of experts on the subject.</p> <p>In December, the Regents asked the UW System Office of Academic and Student Affairs to create a task force to present a series of proposals that address challenges and questions related to such enrollments.</p> <p>The challenges include:<br /> <br /> &bull; Significant declines in enrollments in teacher education, teacher certification, and school leadership programs;</p> <p>&bull; The low number of certified teachers and administrators graduating from UW System institutions &mdash; especially relative to the demand.</p> <p>The task force will address how the UW System can work with stakeholders to improve college affordability, reduce student loan debt, address teacher workforce shortages in Wisconsin, and increase access to teacher education and school leadership programs in the UW System. It will also focus attention on understanding the concerns of communities, district administrators, school leaders, teachers, students, and parents while also raising the esteem of teaching in Wisconsin.</p> <p>&ldquo;We welcome the opportunity to help put forward solutions to Wisconsin&rsquo;s most pressing challenges,&rdquo; UW System President Ray Cross says in the news release.&nbsp; &ldquo;Whether it is economic development, research, or education, the UW System will be on the frontlines in offering its experience to help make a better Wisconsin.&rdquo;</p> <p>Other members of the task force are: Gary Albrecht, commissioner, CESA Statewide Network and interim school superintendent, Wauzeka-Steuben School District; John Ashley, executive director, Wisconsin Association of School Boards; Mary Gulbrandsen, executive director, Fund for Wisconsin Scholars, and a member of the UW-Madison School of Education&rsquo;s Board of Visitors; Kim Kaukl, executive director, Wisconsin Rural Schools Alliance; Carmen Manning, dean, UW-Eau Claire College of Education and Human Sciences; and Carolyn Stanford Taylor, superintendent of public instruction, Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction.</p> <p>Others may be added to the task force.</p> <p><em>Information in this news release was provided by the UW System.&nbsp;</em></p>urn:uuid:9301c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2018/12/10/fall-2018-issue-of-learning-connections-available-online Fall 2018 issue of Learning Connections available onlineThe latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine published twice a year for alumni and friends of the UW-Madison School of Education, is now available online. The ​Fall 2018 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students and alumni. The theme for this latest issue is impact. By tapping into its talents and expertise, the School is involved in a range of initiatives across the arts, health and education that are designed to positively impact our community — and our world. Mon, 10 Dec 2018 11:30:00 Z<p>The latest edition of Learning Connections, a news magazine published twice a year for alumni and friends of the UW-Madison School of Education, is <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections" title="Read the online edition of Learning Connections here" target="_blank">now available online</a>.</p> <p>The ​Fall 2018 issue is filled with exciting news about School of Education faculty, staff, students and alumni. (A pdf of the Fall 2018 print edition of Learning Connections is <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/docs/WebDispenser/news-connections-pdf/lc_fall2018-final-hi-res.pdf?sfvrsn=4" title="View a pdf of the print Learning Connections" target="_blank">available here</a>.)</p> <p><a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/docs/WebDispenser/news-connections-pdf/lc_fall2018-final-hi-res.pdf?sfvrsn=4" title="View a pdf of the Fall 2018 print Learning Connections" target="_blank"><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/lc_fall2018_cover_350px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Cover of Fall 2018 Learning Connections" title="lc_fall2018_cover_350px" class="FloatImageRight" /></a>The theme for this latest issue is <strong><em>impact</em></strong>.</p> <p>By tapping into its talents and expertise, the School is involved in a range of initiatives across the arts, health and education that are designed to positively impact our community &mdash; and our world. The Fall 2018 edition features a few examples of how faculty, staff, students and alumni are working together and with valuable partners to push boundaries and deliver innovative programs that are making a difference in real and relevant ways.</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/teaching-about-2018-elections" title="Learn about the Teaching About the 2018 Elections Conference" target="_blank">Impact</a>: Teaching About the 2018 Elections Conference delivers strategies and tools to help teachers engage students in discussions of controversial political issues</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/fauhaus" title="Learn about the FauHaus project" target="_blank">Impact</a>: Faisal Abdu&rsquo;Allah&rsquo;s FauHaus project offers court-involved youth a 'space of imagination and infinite possibilities'</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/trans-research-lab" title="Learn about the Trans Research Lab" target="_blank">Impact</a>: Stephanie Budge&rsquo;s Trans Research Lab is pioneering rigorous research while also advocating for the populations it serves</p> <h3>Additional Fall 2018 edition highlights include:</h3> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/letter-from-the-dean" title="Read the Letter from the Dean Diana Hess" target="_blank">Letter from the Dean</a>: As Diana Hess begins her fourth year as dean of the School of Education, she notes that she is consistently inspired by the range of impactful efforts taking place across the arts, health and education</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/news-and-notes" title="Read news and notes" target="_blank">News and notes</a>: Check out highlights from across the School over the past six months</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/research-news" title="Read about research news" target="_blank">Research news</a>: Learn about several projects that were recently funded by federal agencies, major foundations and more</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/zemke-gift" title="Read about the Zemke gift" target="_blank">Philanthropy</a>: Zemke gift supporting 'sifting and winnowing' via occupational science research</p> <p>&bull; <a href="http://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/fruth-gift" title="Read about the Fruth gift" target="_blank">Philanthropy</a>: 'Accidental Professor' Fruth bolsters scholarship support with planned gift</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/media-mentions" title="Read the media mentions" target="_blank">Media mentions</a>: Sampling of media outlets putting the spotlight on, and utilizing the expertise of, faculty members from across the School</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/summer-term" title="Read about a Summer Term class" target="_blank">Summer Term</a>: GPS and other technology helping athletes find fitness faster</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/imaging-self" title="Read about Imaging Self" target="_blank">Imaging Self</a>: Course helps high school students explore the arts &mdash; and themselves &mdash; in college setting during summer</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/student-news" title="Read about student news" target="_blank">Students news</a> roundup</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/alumni-spotlight" title="Read about alum Jessica Stovall" target="_blank">Alumni spotlight</a>: TV series highlights alumna Stovall's struggle for equity at Chicago-area school</p> <p>&bull; <a href="https://news.education.wisc.edu/news-publications/learning-connections/2018-fall/class-notes" title="Read about what School of Education alumni are up to" target="_blank">Class notes</a>: Check out what your fellow School of Education alumni are up to</p>urn:uuid:4ff8c137-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2018/12/03/uw-madison-s-trans-research-lab-featured-in-our-lives-magazine UW-Madison’s Trans Research Lab featured in Our Lives magazineThe UW-Madison Trans Research Lab (TRL) was the topic of an article recently published by Our Lives magazine. Lab founder Stephanie Budge, who is an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology, was interviewed by Our Lives, along with some members of the lab. The TRL, which was founded in August 2014, remedies the lack of research on trans issues by exploring mental and physical health needs and care for the transgender, nonbinary and gender-nonconforming (TNG) community.Mon, 03 Dec 2018 11:00:00 Z<p>The UW-Madison Trans Research Lab (TRL) was the topic of an article recently published by Our Lives magazine.</p> <p>Lab founder Stephanie Budge, who is an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Counseling Psychology, was interviewed by Our Lives, along with some members of the lab.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/budge-200-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Budge" displaymode="Original" title="Budge 200 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Budge </figcaption> </figure> </div> The TRL, which was founded in August 2014, remedies the lack of research on trans issues by exploring mental and physical health needs and care for the transgender, nonbinary and gender-nonconforming (TNG) community. One of their biggest projects examined different types of psychotherapy to determine whether it was effective, and if it was, how it worked to bring about change. The TRL has also been involved in the Wisconsin Trans Youth Community Needs Assessment, analyzing data focusing on school safety, rural youth, and focus groups with young TNG individuals across Wisconsin.</p> <p>Our Lives explains how this lab is not only unique for its topic of study, but its dual focus on scientific research and social advocacy. Budge describes for Our Lives the lab&rsquo;s mission as using research and evidence to guide their advocacy for better access to health care for TNG individuals. Lab member Ash recognizes potential concerns of research bias, but reaffirms that the lab is &ldquo;not trying to skew results to fit a political agenda. &hellip; We&rsquo;re trying to academically uncover results that are as representative as possible using the knowledge and personal experiences of people that are being studied.&rdquo; </p> <p>Because of its special focus of advocacy, the TRL has stirred huge interest in the community. Undergraduate students, graduate students, and members of the public have found the lab to be an important and affirming place.</p> <p>One lab member, Darren, highlights the significance of the his experience with the TRL, telling Our Lives: &ldquo;Being a part of this lab makes it feel like you&rsquo;re doing ground-breaking work and in a high-quality way.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Read the full Our Lives magazine report <a href="http://ourlivesmadison.com/article/asking-our-questions/" title="Read more here" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:6ddfc137-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2018/10/25/the-discussion-project-accepting-applications-for-spring-2019-cohort The Discussion Project accepting applications for Spring 2019 cohortThe Discussion Project is currently accepting applications for the Spring 2019 cohort. This initiative is a professional development program for UW-Madison faculty and teaching staff, and is designed to help participants: Learn to create inclusive classroom climates; develop discussion strategies for both small and large groups; improve facilitation skills; contemplate discussion evaluation and assessment; consider ethical issues related to classroom discussion; and learn about ways to assess discussion.Thu, 25 Oct 2018 10:39:00 Z<p>The&nbsp;<a href="https://discussion.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank"><strong>Discussion Project</strong></a>&nbsp;is currently accepting applications for the Spring 2019 cohort.</p> <p><img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/discussion-project.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="The Discussion Project" title="Discussion Project" class="FloatImageRight" />This initiative is a professional development program for UW-Madison faculty and teaching staff, and is designed to help participants:</p> <ul> <li>Learn to create inclusive classroom climates.&nbsp;</li> <li>Develop discussion strategies for both small and large groups.&nbsp;</li> <li>Improve facilitation skills.&nbsp;</li> <li>Contemplate discussion evaluation and assessment.&nbsp;</li> <li>Consider ethical issues related to classroom discussion.&nbsp;</li> <li>Learn about ways to assess discussion.</li> </ul> <p>Participants receive $500 of flex funding for completing all program requirements.<br /> <br /> The&nbsp;<a href="https://discussion.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank">Discussion Project</a>&nbsp;is being created and implemented by&nbsp;<a href="https://discussion.education.wisc.edu/project-staff/" target="_blank">Paula McAvoy</a>,&nbsp;in collaboration with&nbsp;School of Education <a href="https://ci.education.wisc.edu/ci/people/faculty/diana-hess" target="_blank">Dean Diana Hess</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>For complete details and to&nbsp; learn how to apply, visit the <a href="https://discussion.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank">The Discussion Project website</a>. The Discussion Project team will begin reviewing applications on Nov. 16, and will continue doing so until the cohort is filled.</p>urn:uuid:7ddbc137-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttps://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/news/2018/10/17/new-faculty-focus--simon-goldberg New Faculty Focus: Simon GoldbergInside UW-Madison recently put the spotlight on the School of Education’s Simon Goldberg in the latest installment of its “New Faculty Focus” segment, a Q&A feature that highlights new faculty members across campus. Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology, and he is an affiliate with the university’s Center for Healthy Minds. Goldberg explains that he “fell in love” with meditation in college, struck by its simple yet powerful techniques. His focus has expanded to include mental health in military veterans.Wed, 17 Oct 2018 10:30:00 Z<p>On Tuesday, Inside UW-Madison put the spotlight on the School of Education&rsquo;s Simon Goldberg in the latest installment of its &ldquo;New Faculty Focus&rdquo; segment, a Q&amp;A feature that highlights new faculty members across campus.</p> <p>Goldberg is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s Department of Counseling Psychology, and he is an affiliate with the university&rsquo;s Center for Healthy Minds.</p> <p>Goldberg explains that he &ldquo;fell in love&rdquo; with meditation in college, struck by its simple yet powerful techniques.&nbsp;<a href="https://insideuw.wisc.edu/trackemail?cn=eml-nwslttr-7291&amp;ea=click&amp;dt=Nonpartisan+students%3B+new+oak+from+old+oak%3B+changes+at+OHR&amp;dp=https%3A%2F%2Fnews.wisc.edu%2Fnew-faculty-focus-simon-goldberg%2F" target="_blank">His focus has expanded</a>&nbsp;to include mental health in military veterans.</p> <h3>Check out the entire Q&amp;A:</h3> <p><strong>Hometown:</strong>&nbsp;Evanston, Illinois.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/simon-goldberg-cihm-professional-photo-500x250.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Simon Goldberg" displaymode="Original" title="Simon-Goldberg-CIHM-Professional-Photo-500x250" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Goldberg </figcaption> </figure> </div> <strong>Educational/professional background:</strong>&nbsp;I completed my bachelors&rsquo; degree in sociology at Tufts University and my Ph.D. in counseling psychology right here at the University of Wisconsin&ndash;Madison.&nbsp; For my clinical internship, I trained at the Seattle VA hospital and completed postdoctoral training in health service research at the University of Washington and the Seattle VA.</p> <p><strong>How did you get into your field of research?</strong>&nbsp;I was drawn to sociology in college as a method for understanding and addressing large-scale challenges facing human societies, but became discouraged by the enormity of tackling these issues at the macro level.&nbsp; I was introduced to meditation after my sophomore year and really just fell in love with it.&nbsp; I was struck by the power of meditation practice, and was fascinated by the possibility that relatively simple (and ancient) techniques could have dramatic intra- and interpersonal effects.&nbsp; After spending several years exploring various Buddhist traditions, I decided to return to graduate school in order to study meditation and psychotherapy using the tools of modern science. My work has since expanded to include a focus on therapist contributions to psychotherapy treatment outcomes and mental health in military veterans.</p> <p><strong>What attracted you to UW&ndash;Madison?</strong>&nbsp;UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s reputation as a research powerhouse was a major draw for me, both as a graduate student and faculty member.&nbsp; I&rsquo;ve found faculty and students to be passionate about their work, sincere, and also very open to building collaborations and working across disciplinary boundaries.&nbsp; I can&rsquo;t imagine a better setting than Madison for housing a world-class university.&nbsp; And, of course, the Terrace can&rsquo;t be beat.</p> <p><strong>What was your first visit to campus like?</strong>&nbsp;My first visit as a prospective graduate student was very exciting.&nbsp; I met with numerous potential mentors and could feel the openness to new possibilities, even in those initial conversations.&nbsp; My first visit as a prospective faculty member was thrilling &ndash; having a chance to be welcomed back as a potential colleague and really just feeling at home here at UW&ndash;Madison.</p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s one thing you hope students who take a class with you will come away with?</strong>&nbsp;I hope to communicate the remarkable potential we have as human beings for growth and change, be that through formal interventions (e.g., psychotherapy, meditation practice) or through positive relationships with others (e.g., families, communities).</p> <p><strong>Do you feel your work relates in any way to the Wisconsin Idea?</strong>&nbsp;Definitely.&nbsp; My work focuses broadly on finding ways to promote well-being and reduce suffering, which certainly relates to the health and well-being of residents of Wisconsin.&nbsp; I have been involved in numerous studies examining both traditional psychotherapy and Buddhist contemplative practices for promoting mental health, whether for children and teachers, smokers attempting to quit, or military veterans.</p> <p><strong>What&rsquo;s something interesting about your area of expertise you can share that will make us sound smarter at parties?</strong>&nbsp;While differences between psychotherapies (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. psychodynamic psychotherapy) account for 1 percent or less of the variance in treatment outcomes, differences between therapists (i.e., a highly effective therapist vs. an ineffective therapist) accounts for approximately 5 times more.&nbsp; Which is to say, it&rsquo;s probably more important to pick a good&nbsp;<em>therapist</em>&nbsp;than a good&nbsp;<em>therapy</em>.</p> <p><strong>Hobbies/other interests:</strong>&nbsp;Bicycle commuting, playing the banjo, cooking vegetarian food.</p>